Here’s how many hours of sleep you lose every week worrying about work

Hard-working Brits are losing a huge amount of sleep each week due to worries about work, a survey has revealed

KNACKERED, stressed-out and weary Brits are losing a huge amount of sleep every week due to worrying about work.

Hard-working and conscientious employed Brits fall way short of the usual eight hours of kip a night, according to the latest survey.

 British workers are losing more than nine hours of sleep a week due to worries about work

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British workers are losing more than nine hours of sleep a week due to worries about work

The survey of 2,000 workers found that workers in the UK lost more than nine hours of sleep every week, due to worries about their job.

It found that the average of amount of sleep lost each week stressing over work was just under nine hours 30 minutes.

That’s 494 hours over the course of a year – more than 20 full days a year and the equivalent of 62 eight-hour sleeps.

The study found that half of all of those polled said they lost sleep because of work worries, with a quarter admitting that they had been so tired they had fallen asleep at work in the past after not getting enough kip.

 Knackered workers said the effects of sleepless nights had a 'negative effect' on how they felt

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Knackered workers said the effects of sleepless nights had a ‘negative effect’ on how they felt
 A quarter surveyed admitted that they had been so tired they had fallen asleep at work

Getty – Contributor
A quarter surveyed admitted that they had been so tired they had fallen asleep at work
 The survey found that one-fifth of workers said they would it 'difficult to switch off from work'

Getty – Contributor
The survey found that one-fifth of workers said they would it ‘difficult to switch off from work’

Knackered workers said the effects of sleepless nights had a ‘negative effect’ on how they felt and 27 per cent said it affected their performance at work.

The survey found that one-fifth of workers said they would it ‘difficult to switch off from work’, with one-in-10 still working – checking emails and replying – while they lie in bed before they try to nod off.

A total of 20 percent said they felt tired at work every day.

Psychologist Dr Ian Wallace said: “The importance of a good night’s sleep for a productive day at work can often be underestimated by both employers and employees.

“In today’s ‘always on’ culture, it can be tempting to bring your work home with you and to let it intrude into your sleeping haven, but this will inevitably result in poor quality sleep and poorer quality of work the next day.

How can I get my energy back and tackle tiredness?

The NHS outlines the best ways to fight fatigue:

  • Eat regularly to keep your energy levels high
  • Perk up with exercise to boost circulation
  • If you’re overweight, shifting some pounds can help make you feel less sluggish
  • Make more time for sleep
  • Take steps to reduce your stress levels – whether this be seeing a medical professional or setting aside time for relaxation
  • Cut down on caffeine – or cut it out entirely
  • Drink less alcohol
  • Keep your body hydrated with plenty of water

“It’s important to banish all electronic devices like computers and phones from your bedroom because these over-stimulate your mind and prevent you from achieving the level of relaxation that you really need for a good night’s sleep.”

He added: “It’s also advisable not to drink coffee, tea or alcohol in the evening.

“Employees may justify drinking coffee as a means to staying alert and alcohol to take the edge off a long hard day, however these are actually stimulants.